Case Study

Case Study - Saving an Island Ecosystem

Controlling Subsurface Hydrocarbon Migration in the Canadian Arctic
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CHALLENGE

A cold war era radar site, which had been intended to provide early detection of missiles fired from the direction of the North Pole, had utilized hydrocarbon fuels for electricity generation, transportation and heating. Environmental audits had detected leaks from the fuel storage tanks into arctic soils. The hydrocarbon concentrations in the soil were measured at levels up to 19,000 ppm with a distribution of readings indicating that the contaminant plume was moving toward the nearby bay.

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…A LOCAL INUIT "BEAR MONITOR" WAS EMPLOYED TO PREVENT PERSONNEL FROM BEING "APPROACHED" BY THE POLAR BEARS THAT ARE INDIGENIOUS TO THE AREA."

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PROCESS / COLLABORATION

Hydrocarbon migration was threatening to contaminate an arctic island and surrounding waters from leakage at the fuel storage tanks of a Cold War era Canadian Arctic radar site. Inhance’s Fluoro-Seal Barrier technology was successfully used, under extreme environmental conditions, to create a subsurface wall that contained the pollution.

SOLUTION

The composite geosynthetic containment barrier wall utilizing a permeation-modified HDPE geomembrane from Inhance to control migration of a hydrocarbon contaminant plume was successfully constructed despite a short lead time and very difficult site conditions. As monitoring of the cut-off wall performance continues, the barrier properties of the HDPE liner play a key role in the success of the pollution containment.

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